Master’s Program

As prerequisites for acceptance to the Master’s program, applicants should have completed the equivalent of a recognized baccalaureate degree in an appropriate field of study and have several years of meaningful professional experience.

Applicants are expected to be proficient in collegiate English language skills and are expected to have access to a computer, email and the Internet, and outside library resources for the full extent of their program.

Completed training from a recognized practitioner program is highly desired, and can be applied toward the diploma or used as elements of the major concentration for the Master of Science in Complementary Therapies.

Degree Requirements
Students in the Master of Science in CAM will complete a minimum of 40 credits above the baccalaureate level including comprehensive examinations and a thesis or scholarly project. The coursework requirements include the academic major, the major concentration, research preparation, the thesis or major project, and additional electives, as needed, to satisfy the minimum credit requirements.

The finishing activities for Master’s students include completion of a comprehensive examination at the conclusion of the academic coursework; preparations of a formal thesis or project proposal, complete the thesis or project, and prepare the manuscript for faculty review. Master’s students also complete an oral review of thesis or project at the conclusion of the physical manuscript review.

The Master’s degree expectations include the following elements of 40 credits above the bachelor’s degree:

  • Core Elements of Academic Major (Required: 18 credits minimum)
  • Major Concentration (Required: 9 credits minimum)
  • Research Preparation (Required: 3 credits minimum)
  • Comprehensive Examination (Required: 2 credits)
  • Thesis Proposal (Required: 2 credits)
  • Thesis Project (Required: 4 credits)
  • Oral Review of Thesis (Required: 2 credits)

Core Competencies
Master’s students in CAM must complete 18 graduate credits in core coursework comprising an academic major or the equivalent from another institution or another related department of AU. CAM foundational competencies are in theories, principles, practices, research, historical, philosophical, and social-cultural implications of the complementary medicine. These courses represent the core competencies and essential elements, which define your field of study and establish the underlying foundations upon which you may base your advanced professional development.

Required CAM courses: (18 credits) or the equivalent transferred in credits

CAM 500: Readings in CAM (3 credits)
CAM 501: Essentials of CAM (3 credits)
CAM 502: Optimal Integral Health (3 credits)
CAM 525: Touch Healing Ethics for Practices & Teaching Energetically (3 credits)
CAM 530: Anatomy & Physiology of the Energy System (3 credits)
CAM 771: Directed Professional Studies in CAM

Major Concentration (Required: 9 credits)
Participants complete a major concentration comprised of nine credits of specialized studies selected from one the following fields of inquiry:

  • Energy Medicine
  • Energy Psychology
  • Energy Kinesiology
  • Energy Dynamics
  • Transpersonal Studies
  • Integral Health Studies

Energy Medicine (Students in this concentration select 9 credits)

CAM 506: Theories, Principles and Practices of Holistic Health (3 credits)
CAM 507: Cross-cultural Traditional Healing Practices in Counseling & Psychotherapy (3 credits)
CAM 508: Integral Healthcare (3 credits)
CAM 526: Directed Intentionality, Prayer and Distance Healing (3 credits)
CAM 529: Preventative Medicine (3 credits)
CAM 540: Program Planning for CAM (3 credits)
CAM 560: Advances in CAM (3 credits)
CAM 751-759: Field Study in CAM (3 credits)
CAM 780: Specialty Theory & Application (3 credits)
CAM 781: Specialty Practicum (3 credits)
CAM 782: Specialty Special Project (3 credits)
CAM 783: Specialty Directed Study (3 credits) 

Energy Psychology (Students in this concentration select 9 credits or related credits including transfer)

CAM 506: Theories, Principles, and Practices of Holistic Health (3 credits)
CAM 507: Cross-cultural Traditional Healing Practices in Counseling& Psychotherapy (3 credits)
CAM 510: The Embodied Mind (3 credits)
CAM 526: Directed Intentionality, Prayer and Distance Healing (3 credits)
CAM 528: Parapsychology and Transpersonal Psychology (3 credits)
CAM 540: Program Planning for CAM (3 credits)
CAM 551: Spiritual Health and Healing (3 credits)
CAM 552: Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP) Theory & Practice (3 credits)
CAM 553: Hypnosis Theory & Practice (3-6 credits)
CAM 559: Innovative and Unconventional Approaches to Psychotherapy (3 credits)
CAM 560: Advances in Energy Medicine (3 credits)
CAM 561: Mind Resonance Process (3 credits)
CAM 563: Child Development in Applied Eco-psychology (3 credits)
CAM 577: Essentials of Energy Psychology (3 credits)
CAM 578: Mind-Body Medicine I: Clinical Health Psychology (3 credits)
CAM 579: Mind-Body Medicine II: Behavioral Medicine & Psychoneuroimmunology (3 credits)
CAM 580: Mind-Body Medicine III: Integral Healthcare (3 credits)
CAM 588: Psychology of Global Citizenship (2-3 credits)
CAM 661: CAM Self Care (3 credits)
CAM 662: Complementary Therapies Clinical Application (3 credits)
CAM 663: Specialist Training CAM (3 credits)
CAM 751-759: Field Study in CAM (3 credits)
CAM 780: Specialty Theory & Application (3 credits)
CAM 781: Specialty Practicum (3 credits)
CAM 782: Specialty Special Project (3 credits)
CAM 783: Specialty Directed Study (3 credits)

Energy Kinesiology (Students in this concentration select 9 credits)

CAM 506: Theories, Principles, and Practices of Holistic Health (3 credits)
CAM 507: Cross-cultural Traditional Healing Practices in Counseling& Psychotherapy (3 credits)
CAM 508: Integral Healthcare (3 credits)
CAM 529: Preventative Medicine (3 credits)
CAM 533: Essentials of Qi Gong (3 credits)
CAM 540: Program Planning for CAM (3 credits)
CAM 551: Spiritual Health and Healing (3 credits)
CAM 560: Advances in CAM (3 credits)
CAM 578: Mind-Body Medicine I: Clinical Health Psychology (3 credits)
CAM 579: Mind-Body Medicine II: Behavioral Medicine & Psychoneuroimmunology (3 credits)
CAM 580: Mind-Body Medicine III: Integral Healthcare (3 credits)
CAM 588: Psychology of Global Citizenship (2-3 credits)
CAM 661: CAM Self Care (3 credits)
CAM 662: Complementary Therapies Clinical Application (3 credits)
CAM 663: Specialist Training CAM (3 credits)
CAM 751-759: Field Study in CAM (3 credits)
CAM 780: Specialty Theory & Application (3 credits)
CAM 781: Specialty Practicum (3 credits)
CAM 782: Specialty Special Project (3 credits)
CAM 783: Specialty Directed Study (3 credits)

Energy Dynamics (Students in this concentration select 9 credits)

CAM 503: Principles of Naturopathy (3 credits)
CAM 504: Overview of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (3 credits)
CAM 506: Theories, Principles and Practices of Holistic Health (3 credits)
CAM 507: Cross-cultural Traditional Healing Practices in Counseling & Psychotherapy (3 credits)
CAM 508: Integral Healthcare (3 credits)
CAM 510: The Embodied Mind (3 credits)
CAM 522: Traditional Medicine (3 credits)
CAM 523: Herbal Medicine (3 credits)
CAM 524: Natural Medicine (3 credits)
CAM 526: Directed Intentionality, Prayer and Distance Healing (3 credits)
CAM 528: Parapsychology and Transpersonal Psychology (3 credits)
CAM 529: Preventive Medicine (3 credits)
CAM 531: Nutritional & Dietary Healing (3 credits)
CAM 533: Essentials of Qi Gong and other Movement Therapies (3 credits)
CAM 540: Program Planning for CAM (3 credits)
CAM 542: Ayurvedia I (3 credits)
CAM 543: Ayurveda II (3 credits)
CAM 544: Ayurveda III (3 credits)
CAM 546: Herbal Immune Sy7stem Enhancement (3 credits)
CAM 547: Herbal Internal Cleansing (3 credits)
CAM 548: Homeopathic Medicine I: Materia Medica, Laws and Principles (3 credits)
CAM 549: Homeopathic Medicine II: Repertory, Case Taking and Applied Practice (3 credits)
CAM 561: Mind Resonance Process (3 credits)
CAM 563: Child Development in Applied Eco-Psychology (3 credits)
CAM 577: Essentials of Energy Psychology (3 credits)
CAM 578: Mind-Body Medicine I: Clinical Health Psychology (3 credits)
CAM 579: Mind-Body Medicine II: Behavioral Medicine & Psychoneuroimmunology (3 credits)
CAM 580: Mind-Body Medicine III: Integral Healthcare (3 credits)
CAM 661: CAM Self Care (3 credits)
CAM 662: Complementary Therapies Clinical Application (3 credits)
CAM 663: Specialist Training CAM (3 credits)
CAM 751-759: Field Study in CAM (3 credits)
CAM 780: Specialty Theory & Application (3 credits)
CAM 781: Specialty Practicum (3 credits)
CAM 782: Specialty Special Project (3 credits)
CAM 783: Specialty Directed Study (3 credits)

Transpersonal Studies (Students in this concentration select 9 credits or related credits including transfer)

CAM 555: Shamanism (3 credits)
CAM 581: Fundamentals of Transpersonal Studies (3 credits)
CAM 582: Wisdom Traditions: World Religions (3 credits)
CAM 583: Human Development: Transpersonal Perspectives (3 credits)
CAM 584: Personal Mythology and Dreamwork (3 credits)
CAM 585: Consciousness & Sexuality (3 credits)
CAM 586: Cross-cultural Consciousness & Ethics (3 credits)
CAM 587: Consciousness & Healing (3 credits)
CAM 588: Paradigms of Consciousness (3 credits)
CAM 589: Process for Becoming More Fully Human (3 credits)
CAM 590: Qualitative Research for CAM (3 credits)
CAM 591: Consciousness & Creativity (3 credits)

Integrative Health Studies (Students in this concentration select 9 credits or related credits including transfer)

CAM 563: The Integrative Model and Philosophy of Self, Culture and Nature (3 credits)
CAM 564: Integrative Healthcare and Lifestyle (3 credits)
CAM 565: Integrative Psychology (3 credits)
CAM 566: Historical Perspectives on the Body (3 credits)
CAM 568: Integrative Health and the Future of Healthcare (3 credits)
CAM 569: Spirituality and Awareness of Cult Dangers (3 credits)

Description of CAM 780-783: External Training in CAM Directed Study (3-9 credits)
Students pursue special “external” training via an approved CAM training course offered at another accredited and approved institution during or prior to entrance at Akamai University.

An example would be professional courses (often for entry-level or continuing professional development and education certification) in Healing Touch (HT), Tapas Acupressure Technique (TAT), Reconance Modulation in Energy Healing, Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), Transform Your Life through Energy Medicine (TYLEM), Touch For Health (TFH), Energy Kinesiology, Polarity Therapy, Wholistic Healing Effective and Effortless (WHEE), Neuro Linguistic Programing (NLP), Thought Field Therapy, Aromatherapy, Acupressure, Hypnotherapy, Reflexology, Yogi, Qigong, Mysticism, Buddhism, or Reiki. These recommendations of qualified training are under the collaborative supervision of qualified faculty from training sponsors, as appropriate.

These course options are intended to allow students to add significantly to their advanced knowledge in the discipline through applied practical energy based training under the leadership of qualified individuals and organizations. Additional documentation may be necessary to determine the current knowledge base of the applying student through interview, submitted documentation and / or additional course work.

Students begin the course of determining appropriate transfer credits with the preparation of a brief training proposal and identification of selective course work and training materials in support of the training.  Approved training requires a completion certificate or letter of affidavit from the trainer or training organization. Training may also take the form of an on-the-job training, on-site internship, an apprenticeship or other formal or semi-formal training activity including professionally presented seminars, conferences, workshops, symposia and retreats that can document partial or all credits to be used.

Required: RES 591 Research Basics for Evaluating CAM (Minimum 3 credits)
Master’s students must pursue studies providing advanced research knowledge necessary for success in their final projects (thesis or major project in lieu of thesis). At least three semester credits of research preparation coursework is required and this might focus upon quantitative and qualitative methods or participatory action research techniques including subject selection, research design, and statistical analysis, as appropriate to each student’s proposed project. Through this requirement, students learn to effectively define applied problems or theoretical issues and articulate the rationale for the study. They should learn to present an effective scholarly review of the academic literature and implement quantitative, qualitative or participatory action methods for evaluating academic issues.

Required: EXM 880 Comprehensive Examination (2 credits)
Once students have completed the coursework elements of their degree, they will be asked to schedule the Comprehensive Examination. The primary mentor and a faculty member representing the secondary academic area conduct both the written and oral components of the examination. The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requiring creative responses that reach for the higher levels of cognition. Your answers are expected to draw from both the primary and secondary competencies of your program with proper referencing of the scholarly literature. The oral part of the examination is normally completed by telephone conference and is intended to allow detailed investigation of your written responses. 

Required: RES 885 Thesis or Project Proposal (2 credits)
You are expected to prepare a formal proposal related to your concept for research under the direction of your primary faculty advisor and according to University expectations. At a minimum, your research proposal should clarify the thesis statement and methodology (including the data gathering instruments and data analysis techniques) and provide an effective overview of the scholarly literature that sets the foundation for the thesis. Your research proposal should also include a brief manuscript outline that demonstrates how you will present in written form the various elements of the research project. 

Required: RES 890 Thesis Project (Minimum 4 credits)
Following approval of your thesis proposal, you will begin your research project. Your thesis may take the form of a traditional research project or it may be a major scholarly project of the type appropriate to the discipline. Whichever approach to the thesis is chosen, the resulting project must demonstrate mastery of a body of knowledge in the major field of study, be your original work and represent a meaningful contribution to the betterment of the human condition or an improvement to the professional field. Your thesis research may be conducted via quantitative, qualitative, or participatory action research. The body of your thesis manuscript, structured according to a set of approved manuscript guidelines, should exceed 75 double spaced, typewritten pages. If your thesis takes the form of a scholarly project, it must follow the guidelines provided by the University. 

Required: EXM 895 Oral Review of Thesis (2 credits)
Once you have prepared the thesis manuscript, you will be asked to schedule the formal review process. Your primary faculty advisor and a faculty member representing the secondary academic area will conduct both the formal physical review of the thesis manuscript and the oral review of thesis.

The physical review of the thesis manuscript usually takes the review committee four to six weeks. Each reviewer will prepare questions and commentary relative to your underlying review of the literature, the thesis methodology, the mechanics of your project, and your presentation of the findings, conclusions and recommendations.

The Oral Review of Thesis is conducted under the direction of your primary faculty advisor with the assistance of one qualified member of the faculty. The examination is carried out by telephone conference call and is designed to allow detailed investigation of your thesis. The faculty reviewers explore with you issues related to your thesis including methodology, review of literature and interpretation of the findings.

One outcome of the thesis review process is a set of final expectations directing you through the remaining tasks for completing the thesis manuscript. Once your final manuscript is approved, you will submit the formal document to an approved bindery and later ship the bound thesis to the University for archival storage. 

The Thesis Committee 

Formation of Thesis Committee
Master’s students have a Thesis Committee of two qualified graduate faculty appointed to oversee and govern the student’s program structure, progress of studies, comprehensive examinations and thesis / dissertation project. 

Responsibilities of Thesis / Project Committee
Under leadership of the Committee Chair, responsibilities of the committee are as follows:

  • Directing the preparation and approval of the student’s plan for study, clarifying the timeline
  • Assignment of faculty to provide instruction and to assist with the functions of the Thesis or Major Project Committee.
  • Providing direction regarding the student’s foundational studies, core studies, specialization, and research preparation coursework.
  • Providing leadership by integrating appropriate research preparation coursework or assignments within the plan for study, distributing the coursework to appropriate faculty for instruction and advisement.
  • Providing leadership for the written and oral components of the student’s comprehensive final examination.
  • Providing oversight, direction, and mentorship during the conduct of the student’s research project and manuscript preparation.
  • Providing leadership for the physical and oral reviews of the research manuscript.
  • Assist the student in making formal changes in the plan study and timeline for completion, by written addendum, as needed to assure effective progress throughout the program of study.
  • Providing final approval for the student’s Thesis and overall degree program and cooperate fully in building the appropriate archival records for the University.

Committee Appointment Schedule
The Committee Chair is appointed immediately following the student’s registration and continues in charge of the student’s program until final completion is recorded at the school of record. While the secondary and tertiary members of the Thesis Committee are identified and confirmed at the onset of the program, and listed in the plan of study, they become active later, just prior to the activities for which they are asked to participate.

Building the Student’s Plan for Study
Immediately following registration, graduate students begin work with their assigned Committee Chair to structure their formal plan for study. The process determines and formalizes the elements of the student’s Master’s program and the timeline for completion.

The plan for study includes the following essential elements:

  • Designation of the degree major for the Study Plan
  • Identification of the required array of coursework for each element of the program
  • Identification of the secondary and tertiary members of the Thesis Committee
  • Appointment and notification of the course module instructors
  • Acceptance of transfer courses for the student’s program

Timeline for completion of the degree program
These activities require active participation in program planning by the student and may take considerable time to complete the dialogue and exchange of information. Students are strongly advised to discuss in detail the elements in the plan for study including the coursework, the examinations, and elements of research including the manuscript guidelines.

Once all of the decisions have been made concerning the plan for study, the student and Committee Chair sign the formal document. Copies of the document are sent to the University headquarters for entry to the permanent student record. The plan for study is then distributed to the participating schools and becomes the document that determines effective progress toward the degree. When the expectations laid out in the plan for study have been successfully accomplished, the student is recommended for the degree by the Committee Chair.

Students are alerted that the University can make no commitment to inclusion of course modules and assignment of instructors to a student program until after the plan for study has been fully processed and approved.